Razor-sharp liquorice sound

Their music is like a bright red cherry-flavoured lollipop which will cut your tongue. Check out the interview with the four superheroines of the current music scene.

The Swedish quartet dropped their debut EP “The Haze Is Forever” in 2015 and stirred up the music scene with an explosion of genuine girl power. They are bringing the blood red dress, ripped tights and loud attitude back to the present-day dull and muddy punkrock waters. Their music is a well-aimed kick with a high heel shoe right in the crotch of all your obsolete ideas about girlhood in music. Groovy Nickz, Groovy Fuck, Lucky Lollo, and Foxy Sagz took a little break while rehearsing to answer some of our sneaky questions on fave artists, feelings and media-perception. Read on!

 

kink_dolores-haze_celine-barwich© Céline Barwich, 2016

 

Your band name comes from Nabokov’s Lolita, right? A lot of the general public perceives the character as this almost evil little temptress who brought it upon herself. Why did you choose the name?
We picked the name because Groovy Nickz had seen the film Lolita and thought that it was a cool name. We’ve also read the book but we didn’t like it. The 1997 film is great, tho. Dominique Swain plays a GREAT Lolita. The other one from the 60s is boring.

 

In one interview, you said that when you looked for the drummer you basically plastered the city with flyers saying something like – hey looking for a drummer, if you like this music hit us up – and a list of your fave artists? What could be seen on that list?
Hmmm, it was probably like Bikini Kill, The Runaways, Broder Daniel, The Hives, Marina & The Diamonds, Jesus and Mary Chain.

 

What’s up with that gender-switched Pierrot le fou reference in The Haze Is Forever video? Would you be the one speaking with words or looking with feelings?
Haha, that was the director’s idea. His name is Daniel Eskils, he’s a great director. We knew we wanted the video to tell a story, not just be a nicely graded video, you know? So we created that opening, and the person playing the boy is actually the producer, haha. I’d (I’m Groovy Nickz btw) want to be the one speaking with words, but my feelings are always all over the place so I think I sometimes tend to confuse people because I think that they know how I feel all the time even though it’s impossible for them to know, lol.

 

Speaking of feelings, your music just seems to be overflowing with a lot of raw and energetic emotion. Is that something you bear in mind while producing music?
Yes, definitely. We want to create music that people can cry to after a breakup but also dance to at the club.

 

There is a lot of that kind of 90’s riot grrrl halo around your band. It’s this girl-empowering message you manifest confidently. Do you take inspiration from that scene?
Media always think Dolores Haze is a riot grrrl band but that is only because we are four girls in a band. Riot Grrrl was a political movement that also included some female fronted bands. And those are bands that we love listening to, but we don’t identify with them like that. People always refer to us as riot grrrl but there is no political agenda in our music. We are sick of talking about the fact that we are girls in a band. And of course we are feminists, but that doesn’t mean we want to talk about it all the time.

 

Yeah, thatˈs understandable. Also, Sweden seems to be pretty advanced in terms of sexual politics and feminism, but despite all of that, have you ever struggled being an all-girls band?
Yes of course. Like I mentioned before people always put us in the genre Riot Grrrl without even reflecting on why they do that. When we won P3 Guld (that’s like BBC Music Award but in Sweden) for Best Rock, people raged because we won over a bunch of men that were the other nominees. And the people who raged were all men. We were a trending topic on Twitter that night, people could simply not grasp that so many great female acts won prizes at that show. They thought it was set up, can you believe?

 

What the heck, thatˈs mental.
Well, besides music you also appear in other projects. Quite recently you teamed up with Monki, who are gradually adopting more and more activist philosophy, for a fashion editorial. Was that collaboration in any way meaningful to you?
Yes! I mean Monki is a major brand, and like all major brands there is always some good and some bad in their work ethics. But we think it’s great that they, as a major brand, use so much great feminist propaganda in their campaigns. Because even though we might be aware of feminism, there is still a LOT of people who aren’t. And it’s also great that they use a variety of different girls to model for them. If I, as a kid, would have seen an Iranian girl (Groovy Nickz: both my parents are from Iran) fronting a band or being at the storefront at Monki I would feel proud and hopeful.

 

kink_dolores-haze_celine-barwich_02© Céline Barwich, 2016

 

If you could organize your own festival, who would be playing and where would it take place?
I’m thinking it would be like by some mountain in Japan and we would play with acts such as Die Antwoord, Sexy Sushi, Bloc Party, The Libertines, Beyoncé, Rihanna, Blondie, Grimes, Uffie, and Marina & The Diamonds.

 

What word describes your sound the best?
Haywire, lol.

 

What is your music hit of 2016?
This playlist we made that is called Hits For Shits. Includes all the best songs for when you simply just hate everyone.

 

Before we finish off, could you tell us a bit about your upcoming plans?
We’re working on the sequel for The Haze Is Forever. And in November we are going to Iceland to play the Iceland Airwaves festival and climb mountains, hug little lambs and eat food.

 

And last but not least; we’re always looking for new artists to feature in our magazine – is there anyone interesting (from your local scene) you think we should write about on Kink?
Delagoon (hot Swedish band, also our friends), Joy (great rapper), Zhala (she’s amazing), Beatrice Eli (popstar).

 

Thanks!

 

Dolores Haze: Blog, Facebook, Instagram, Soundcloud, Twitter
Photos: Céline Barwich
Interview: Padla Nemeckova + Anna Wim
Text: Padla Nemeckova

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